Tag Archives: Amanda Dawn Christie

Ghosts In The Airglow: HAARP transmission frequencies and times, March 25-28

Yesterday, we posted a note about Amanda Dawn Christie’s upcoming transmissions from the HAARP facility in Alaska.

Amanda has just notified me that the frequencies and times of the experiments have been posted on the project’s website: Ghosts In The Airglow.

You should keep the schedule handy during transmissions as there are factors that could influence frequency selection. Amanda notes:

As for Frequencies: Ghosts in the Air Glow has 10 movements, several of which are simultaneously on two different frequencies. In preparation, frequency selections had to be submitted in advance for tuning, so in order to allow for various conditions, three frequency options were prepared (a low, a mid, and a high). Only one will be used on the day of transmission, but it could be any of these three. I am listing them in the order of preference, with the most likely frequency first. All modes are AM.

Click here to view frequencies and times.

I would also suggest you follow Amanda’s Twitter feed during the transmissions as she plans to post live updates. In addition, she has set up a live feed of the transmissions on her website.

No doubt, this will be a unique listening and receiving experiment for all!

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Amanda to combine art with HAARP

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Eric McFadden, who notes this piece in the Southgate ARC newsletter about our friend Amanda Dawn Christie who is doing a HAARP experiment like no other:

Concordia transmission artist Amanda Dawn Christie will use the world’s most capable high-power, high-frequency transmitter HAARP in Alaska to send art around the world and into outer space using Slow Scan TV

Concordia News reports:

In the shadow of Mount Sanford, surrounded by Alaskan wilderness, you’ll find the most powerful radio transmitter on earth.

On this remote site, scientists use a unique tool called the Ionospheric Research Instrument (IRI) to create radio-induced aurora, also known as airglow. But it’s never been used by a Canadian artist to transmit art — until now.

The IRI’s human-made northern lights inspired interdisciplinary artist Amanda Dawn Christie to create Ghosts in the Air Glow: an upcoming transmission art project that will use the IRI to play with the liminal boundaries of outer space.

“I was so fascinated by these airglow experiments — and the relationship between the ionosphere and radio communications — I felt compelled to create an artwork specific to the site and its history,” says Christie, assistant professor in Concordia’s Department of Studio Arts.

She will be embedding her own encoded SSTV images, audio compositions and propagation tests into IRI experiments from March 25 to 28.

Read the full story at
https://www.concordia.ca/news/stories/2019/03/21/concordia-transmission-artist-launches-a-high-frequency-project-in-alaska.html

Artist made a radio out of a kitchen sink
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2018/december/artist-made-a-radio-out-of-a-kitchen-sink.htm

Amanda Dawn Christie
http://www.
amandadawnchristie.ca/

https://twitter.com/magnet_mountain

For further info on HAARP HF experiments follow Chris Fallen KL3WX
https://twitter.com/ctfallen

Note that Amanda will share the frequencies and times with us as soon as they are made public. Stay tuned!

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Spectres of Shortwave streaming online for limited time

Many thanks to Amanda Dawn Christie, who writes:

I also want to let you know that Spectres of Shortwave is currently screening online, for a limited time (March 4), on this science film website: https://www.labocine.com/film/2172

I think it costs $3 for the month to access all of the films on this site.

Feel free to let others know.

Many thanks for letting us know, Amanda!

Post Readers: I’ve been to a screening of Spectres of Shortwave—it’s a wonderful film and certainly a must-watch for anyone who loved Radio Canada International.

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine: “This Artist Made a Radio Out of a Kitchen Sink”

(Source: IEEE Spectrum via Ed C)

Amanda Dawn Christie’s work commemorates the fading glory of shortwave radio

By Stephen Cass

Some artists work in oils, say, or marble. Amanda Dawn Christie works in radio. Not radio in the sense of performing on air. But radio in the sense of the giant cultural and technological phenomenon that is broadcasting, and specifically shortwave broadcasting.

For decades, shortwave was the only way to reach a global audience in real time. Broadcasters such as the BBC World Service and Voice of America used it to project “soft power.” But as the Internet grew, interest in shortwave diminished.

Christie’s art draws from shortwave’s history, representing it in sculpture, performance, photography, and film. Her focus is the life of the Radio Canada International (RCI) transmitter complex, located in Sackville, New Brunswick, near Christie’s hometown. The transmitter was in operation from the 1940s until 2012. “Those towers were always just a part of the landscape that I grew up around,” says Christie. It took a radio-building workshop to spark her interest: “I built a radio out of a toilet-paper tube…. I thought I did a great job because I picked up Italian radio. It turned out I did not—I was just really close to this international shortwave site.”[…]

Continue reading the full article at the IEEE Spectrum Magazine.

So great to see SWLing Post friend, Amanda Dawn Christie, featured in the IEEE Spectrum! Thanks for the tip, Ed!

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June 13: Spectres of Shortwave film screening and simulcast via German Shortwave Service

(Source: Amanda Dawn Christie)

Coming up this summer:

Spectres of Shortwave /
Ombres des ondes courtes

June 13 juin
Film Screening / Projection @ 7pm / 19 h
Cinémathèque Québécoise
Montréal, Québec

Radio Simulcast @ 23:00 UTC in Europe
German Shortwave Service – 3895 kHz

A film about radio waves, relationships, landscape, and loss.
This experimental documentary film about the Radio Canada International (RCI) shortwave radio towers, presents the site through four seasons, leading up to, and including, its demolition in winter of 2014. Images captured on 35mm film accompanied by personal stories from by people who lived with the site, interwoven with field recordings made by placing contact microphones onto the towers themselves.

Screenings of this film are accompanied by a radio simulcast, so that while viewers watch the film on a big screen in one part of the world, listeners can hear the sound track over radio waves in another part of the world. This Montreal screening is accompanied by a shortwave simulcast in Germany.

1 hour 53 minutes, colour, 5.1 sound
www.spectresofshortwave.net
http://www.amandadawnchristie.ca
Cinémathèque website and info
facebook event

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