Tag Archives: Mario Filippi (N2HUN)

New lot of radio gear at Schulman Auctions

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi, who writes:

Schulman Auctions scheduled another on-line auction, lots of ham gear and accessories. A few shortwave radios in this auction.

Thanks for the tip, Mario! Looks like the online auction starts in two days (from time of posting). Lots of great gear to browse!

Click here to check out the offerings.

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Mario spots a National Panasonic Cougar 2200 (RF-2200) on eBay

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi, who notes a National Panasonic Cougar RF-2200 that’s currently available on eBay. The Cougar is an Asian version of the venerable Panasonic RF-2200.

This model appears to have an original box in great shape. The price is steep, though at roughly US $563.35 as a Buy It Now listing although it does include free economy shipping from Japan. The seller also notes, “The first stage of the antenna is removed, so it is bonded.” Not exactly sure what that means and am guessing it’s a machine translation from Japanese.

Mario notes that most of the Cougar 2200s he spots on eBay are from sellers in Japan and at a recent auction one fetched $400.

Click here to view on eBay.

Thanks for the tip, Mario!

Curious if any Post readers have the Cougar 2200? I’ve never seen one in real life, but I assume the differences between it and the RF-2200 or DR22 is branding and power cord? Please feel free to comment if you own one.

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HamEstate.com makes it easy for families of radio enthusiasts to sell gear

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), who shares a link to HamEstate.com: an online site that simplifies the process of selling radio gear from family estates.

I was not familiar with this site, but it appears they have good reviews. Possibly an option for families who’ve no one to help them sell a loved one’s gear. Of course, you might enjoy browsing their offerings as well!

Click here to check out HamEstate.com.

Thanks for the tip, Mario!

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Mario suggests a virtual visit to Schulman Auction

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi, who writes:

You may already know about Schulman auctions, but if not here’s the site: https://www.schulmanauction.com/vintage-electronics/

Even if one is not interested in vintage electronics it’s still a great window shopping experience.

Have a great day and 73’s

Thanks for the tip, Mario! I have browsed their offerings in the past and it is an impressive amount of gear. As you say, a great place to window shop and possibly even place a bid!

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Finding local Emergency Alert Stations in the US

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), who shares the following guest post:


Emergency Alert Stations: A great source of local information

by Mario Filippi

During the pandemic a source of local information for residents in certain areas of the country can be found on Emergency Advisory Radio stations that dot the country and provide 24/7 information pertinent to a community.  Not all communities have these stations, which can be found from 1610 – 1710 kHz and operate at varying power outputs.

Author’s Yaesu FRG-100 tuned to EAS station

For example, a station I regularly hear is WRBX655 about 12 miles away in Franklin Township, NJ operating on 1630 kHz : https://www.franklintwpnj.org/Home/Components/News/News/6384/1130?cftype=News

At the moment it is broadcasting information on COVID-19 from the Center for Disease Control.  Every EAS  station has a call sign and wattage generally is from about 10 – 50 watts. However some stations do not necessarily announce their call signs so you can check theradiosource at: http://www.theradiosource.com/resources/stations-alert.htm

Now some of these stations are part of the HAR (Highway Advisory System) that broadcast on major roadways and usually have prominent road signs announcing where to tune your car’s AM radio for latest traffic conditions.  These stations were also termed TIS (Traveler’s Information Stations) at one time and were the precursors of HAR.  However, over the years the FCC allowed more leeway on what information could be broadcast and as a result these EAS stations appeared in communities and even state parks.

You can look up the locations of these stations to ascertain if one serves your community but the best way is to tune regularly from 1610 – 1710 kHz.  The optimal time to listen is during daylight hours as propagation changes greatly after dark and you’ll hear commercial AM radio stations coming in and overpowering most EAS.  As for range, I’ve heard HAR stations as far away as 40 miles depending on ground wave conditions which can vary greatly. QSB is common. Many of these stations will rebroadcast NWS weather information when no pertinent emergencies exist and that is another way to spot them. Some highway stations I’ve heard will begin each broadcast loop with a tone, they’re all different in their approach.

Attached [at the top of the page] is a picture of the author’s Yaesu FRG-100 tuned to WRBX655 from Franklin Township, New Jersey. For an antenna I’ve used a 31 foot vertical and a loop and success will depend on using an outdoor antenna but when away from the home QTH, I’ve heard many of these stations while traveling on the roadways of America, They’re a good break casual AM radio listening.  Give it a try.


Thank you, Mario! I must admit that when I travel, I often hunt down EAS transmitters via my car’s AM radio. Besides being a good source of local information, I do know some DXers who’ve identified and logged an impressive number of distant stations when conditions were ideal. 

If you live outside the US, do you have similar networks for local information? Please comment!

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Radio Deal: Talking House AM transmitters $25 each

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), who shares a find in the QRZ.com online swapmeet: Talking House Broadcasters.

If you’re not aware, Talking House Broadcasters are AM transmitters that were designed to be used by real estate agents so that potential customers could drive by a house on the market, tune their car’s AM radio to a specific frequency, and listen to a pre-recorded message.

I’ve also been to ARRL Field Day sites where a Talking House Broadcaster was used to relay information about the Field Day activities to visitors.

Of course, I would use one of these to broadcast my own music and Internet radio streams throughout my house. If I didn’t already have an SSTRAN AMT3000, I would snap one of these up in a heartbeat!

The AM output power is FCC Part 15 compliant, but with a good antenna/ground, you might be surprised at the signal’s footprint!

The seller currently has three working units he’s priced at $25/each or $50 for all three.  Even as used units, this is a fantastic deal!

Click here to check out the ad on QRZ.com.

Assume if the link above is broken or missing, the items are all sold. Thanks again for the tip, Mario!

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Panasonic RF-2200 antenna coupler (model RD-9820) on eBay

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Mario Filippi (N2HUN), who recently discovered a model RD-9820 antenna coupler for the Panasonic RF-2200. Mario states, “[The] price is reasonable and they take offers.”

Please, someone purchase this before I do in a moment of weakness. I’ve two RF-2200s, but do not have the matching coupler. It is incredibly temping even though I know I’d rarely use it!

Click here to view on eBay (this partner link can support the SWLing Post)

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