Helliniki Radiophonia on 9,420 kHz or 9,415 kHz?

GreeceSWLing Post reader, Mark Clark writes:

“Tuned [to Helliniki Radiophonia] during band scan at 0110 UT. It was playing 1970s rock music like Love is Like Oxygen by Sweet and Evil Woman by ELO. Male announcer speaking in Greek between each song. Initial signal strength was weak SIO 233 on PL-880 and PL-380. Also weak and noisy on University of Twente Websdr. Switched to local Perseus with Wellbrook antenna. Reception improved from SIO 443 to SIO 555 during recording of 100 kHz wide RF from 0126 to 0140.

Observation showed carrier on 9415 with nothing on assigned 9420 kHz as per Aoki and EiBi. Switched back to PL-880 as signal had improved to SIO 555. PL-880 with internal whip provided easy copy from 0140 to 0145 when signal suddenly dropped out. Signal returned several seconds later but decidedly not on 9415. Tuning to 9420 restored clear strong signal. Verified via local Perseus receiver that carrier was now on 9420 with no carrier at 9415. Same male announcer was noted between songs at 0153. University of Twente Websdr also showed same shift. Ended reception at 0154 UT.”

Many thanks for this detailed listener report, Mark.  Indeed, several of us have noted Helliniki Radiophonia on 9,415 occasionally. Last year, I made all-night recordings where RH remained on 9,415 the entire time.

I have no idea why RH is hopping between 9,415 and 9,420 kHz. Initially, I thought this may be due to the fact that they were silent on 9,420 for an extended perios of time last year and Voice Of Islamic Republic of Iran, who shares the same frequency, seemed to take its place. I even had a few readers note that when Helliniki Radiophonia returned to 9,420 kHz, interference from Iran was substantial and the occasional move to 9,415 kHz was, perhaps, to obtain a clear frequency.

In truth, though, this is speculation; is this frequency shift deliberate or accidental? Do any SWLing Post readers have a definitive answer?

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Shortwave Radio Recordings: Voice of Nigeria

VON-BH front yardFor your listening pleasure: the Voice of Nigeria–recorded on January 28, 2015, starting at 10:00 UTC on 9,690 kHz.

The past few days, the signal out of Ikorodu has been much stronger than normal, so I’ve spent several afternoons listening to the wonderful sounds and music from the Voice of Nigeria.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

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Eton Traveler III: $34 shipped on Blinq

The Eton Traveler III

The Eton Traveler III

I just discovered and ordered an Eton Traveler III on Blinq.com for $34.19. It’s listed as “Used – Very Good” condition–most likely an open box item.

It appears Blinq only has one more left in stock–though I imagine more will sporadically appear in the future. While I have received a dud radio from Blinq once (a 450DLX), their return process is so effortless and efficient, I personally don’t mind taking my chances.

Click here to snag this deal on Blinq.com.

Update: I also noticed that Blinq is selling the Traveler III on Amazon.com with the same conditions: click here to open the product page, then click on “used and new” under the “Other Sellers on Amazon” sidebar.

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Kyodo News Agency Fax and the Sony CRF-V21

My friend, @K7al_L3afta, posted to Twitter, the following fax he decoded from the Kyodo News Agency on 12,745 kHz today:
KyodoNewsAgency-001

The Kyodo News Agency is possibly the last marine weather fax station which faxes daily news (full newspapers) and navigational warnings to ships at sea.

PL-660For those of you who might believe it takes a sophisticated setup to decode a FAX transmission, you would be incorrect. @K7al_L3afta uses only a Tecsun PL-660 portable hooked up to his PC running the MultiPSK application. He lives in Morocco–in an urban environment with lots of RFI as well, so those of you living in a similar situation should feel encouaged.

After posting the FAX image, our friend @LondonShortwave then sent a link to a Sony radio I have never seen before: the Sony CRF-V21.

Image source: Universal Radio

The Sony CRF-V21 (Image source: Universal Radio)

The CRF-V21 is a full-featured shortwave radio receiver with built-in printer and decoding for FAX and RTTY. In fact, with an optional AN-P1200 satellite antenna, the CRF-V21 will even copy and print G.O.E.S. satellite weather transmissions.

Here is Universal Radio’s archived description of the CRF-V21:

The Sony CRF-V21 Visual World Band Radio is the first portable to offer integrated facsimile (FAX) and radioteletype (RTTY) shortwave reception. You can print RTTY and FAX transmissions directly with the built-in thermal printer. Supported RTTY modes include Baudot at 60, 66, 75 and 100 WPM and ASCII at 110, 200, 300 and 600 bps. FAX shortwave speeds include 60, 90 120 and 240 rpm. Even G.O.E.S. satellite weather transmissions may be copied and displayed with the optional AN-P1200 satellite antenna.

Frequency coverage is 9 kHz to 30 MHz for all longwave, medium wave and shortwave frequencies. Plus FM coverage from 76 to 88 MHz and NOAA satellite channels 137.62/141.21 MHz. The optional AN-P1200 antenna system adds 1.6910/1.6945 GHz G.O.E.S. satellite reception. Another highlight of this radio is built-in spectrum display showing a visual picture of 200 kHz or 5 MHz of the shortwave spectrum.

Other refinements include:   Mini Earphone Jack, S Meter, 350 Alpha Memories, Carry Handle, Clock, 8 Event Timer, Scan, Sweep, FM AFC, Synchronous Detection, Attenuator, 6/3.5/2.7/14 kHz Selectivity, AF Filter, Record Jack, Dial Lamp, Keypad and LCD Contrast Adjustment.

The CRF-V21 is supplied with:  AN-V21 telescopic antenna unit, ACP-88R AC power unit, NP-227 battery, BCA-70 charge tray, antenna cable, protective cover, UPP-21 thermal printer paper and manuals. Operates from 110/120/220/240 VAC. Requires two AA cells for memory retention. 16.25 x 11.25 x 6.75 inches (21 lbs.).

The CRF-V21 is basically an all-in-one Holy Grail portable for those at sea!

@LondonShortwave also shared the following video of the CRF-V12 in operation:

Simply amazing. I love the display–reminds me of the Eton E1. I would expect excellent audio out of this rig as well.

When I checked today, there wasn’t even one CRF-V21 listed on eBay–not even as a completed listing. I imagine they are rare indeed.

Out of curiosity, do any SWLing Post readers have a Sony CRF-V12 in their collection? I would certainly like to add one to mine someday.

Many thanks to my friends @K7al_L3afta and @LondonShortwave for this radio diversion today!

Posted in Articles, Digital Modes, News, Portable Radio | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Attila notes the passing of Deutschlandradio longwave

DL-RadioSWLing Post reader, Pázmány Attila, writes:

“I’m a SWL-MWL-LWL from Hungary, Europe. I like your blog where I can read about radio news and reviews. You report about new stations if they appear in the air and about closed stations if they disappear from the air. I did not observed any news in your blog about the closed LW stations of the “Deutschlandradio”. There were two frequencies for “Deutschlandfunk” (153 kHz and 207 kHz) and one for “Deutschlandradio-kultur” (177 kHz). Here in the center of the Carpathian Basin – many hundreds kms from the statons – I could hear them very well. But not any more. For some weeks it seems that they have disappeared.

I checked the website of the German Radio, and on the following pages LW frequencies are not mentioned any more:

http://www.deutschlandradio.de/frequenzliste-deutschlandfunk.214.de.html

http://www.deutschlandradio.de/frequenzliste-deutschlandradio-kultur.213.de.html

I also checked the http://www.shortwaveschedule.com/index.php?now=true for more information, but these LW stations are also not shown there. So DLF ended its LW broadcasts definitely.

I’m sorry for it. Beside this German radio had a great foreign service in the past (DW – also on Hungarian). But it was closed in the last 10-15 years.”

Thanks for your message, Attila. Being State side, there are few options for listening to the longwave stations I so enjoyed while living in Europe at various times over the past two decades. With that said, when propagation is in my favor, on winter nights, I occasionally hear faint European LW stations like France Inter on 162 kHz.

At some point, I need to dig up a one sheet listing of all longwave stations that are still on the air. Does such a thing exist?

Posted in Longwave, News | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

WRTH 2015 available on Amazon.com

WRTH-Amazon-Page

The publishers of the Wold Radio TV Handbook sent the following message to me regarding availability of WRTH 2015 on Amazon.com:

“WRTH 2015 is now available on Amazon.com, despite the first page listing it as “This title has not yet been released.” We have been unable to get Amazon to change this page.

Readers in North America should click on the listing for other new offerscurrently showing as 8 New from $27.28. The copies shipped by us to Amazon are listed under WRTH Publications Limited. These copies will be fulfilled direct from Amazon distribution centers. All the other offers on the page rely on shipping copies from Europe.”

Many thanks to WRTH for clarifying this. Please click here to order WRTH 2015 from Amazon.com.

Click here to read our overview of WRTH 2015 (hint: another excellent issue).

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Shortwave Radio Recordings: Radio Vilnius 1990-1991

Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Richard Langley, has digitized another set of historic off-air recordings–this time, documenting the independence of Lithuania through Radio Vilinus.

Many thanks to Richard for the following guest post and archived audio:


Cathedral in Vilnius, seen in 1912 - Source: Public Domain via WikiMedia Commons

Radio Vilnius 1990-1991

On 11 March 1990, Lithuania was the first Soviet republic to declare its independence. The Soviet Union issued an ultimatum to the Lithuanian authorities to renounce independence or suffer the consequences.

On 17 March 1990, Lithuania rejected the demand and the Soviet Union responded by applying economic sanctions and occupied parts of Vilnius, the capital city. In January 1991, the Soviets launched a larger scale operation against Lithuania. On 11 January, Soviet military units seized several building in Vilnius and elsewhere. On 12 January, civilians congregated outside some strategically important buildings such as those of the Supreme Council (the Seimas Palace), the Radio and Television Committee, the Vilnius TV Tower, and the main telephone exchange in an attempt to prevent them from falling into the hands of the Soviet military. In the early hours of 13 January, tanks and soldiers attacked the TV tower. Fourteen Lithuanians and one Russian soldier died.

Subsequently, Soviet forces surrounded and entered the Radio and Television Committee building and forced the TV station off the air. Shortly thereafter, a small TV studio in Kaunas was used to resume TV transmissions and put out a call for help. Radio transmissions were also affected. Although Soviet forces were in the vicinity of the Supreme Council building, they retreated instead of attacking. The occupation and military raids continued for several months following the attacks.

Lithuania-FlagSubsequent Lithuanian-Russian negotiations resulted in the signing of a treaty on 31 January. A referendum on independence held on 9 February overwhelmingly supported the full and total independence of Lithuania. Other republics of the Soviet Union declared their independence and following the resignation speech by Mikhail Gorbachev on 25 December, the Soviet Union was dissolved the next day. The last Russian troops left Lithuania on 31 August 1993.

Radio Vilnius, the external service of Lithuanian Radio, transmitted news about events in Lithuania and the other Baltic republics even at the height of the Soviet attacks. The broadcasts were made, in part, using transmitters elsewhere in the Soviet Union. However, there was a temporary interruption in these broadcasts after the occupation of the Radio and TV Centre by Soviet troops early in the morning of 13 January. They resumed on 25 January.

Radio Nederland’s “Media Network” programs of 20 January 1991 and 14 January 1992 featured reports on Radio Vilnius and the Soviet occupation. The sound files of these programs are available on the Web (“Media Network Vintage Vault“).

I have six recordings of Radio Vilnius English Service shortwave broadcasts between March 1990 and January 1991. These were received in Hanwell, New Brunswick, Canada, using a Sony ICF-7600D receiver and supplied wire antenna draped around the listening room.

Recording 1 (30 minutes):

28 March 1990, 22:00 UTC, 11770 kHz (00m:00s – 00m:55s)

Strong signal. Interval signal (IS) and station identification (ID) but the transmission was cut off in mid-sentence: “This is Radio Vilnius. Hello and welcome to our daily broad” All that could be heard faintly on this frequency then was Radio Liberty in Russian (“Govorit Radio Svoboda”). Initially could hear nothing on Radio Vilnius parallel frequencies until about four minutes into the broadcast when a very faint signal on 12060 kHz could be heard (not recorded).

29 March 1990, 22:00 UTC, 12060 kHz (00m:55s – 02m:04s)

Weak signal. IS, station identification, and first part of “News About Lithuania.” Radio teletype interference. Checked other frequencies.

3 April 1990, 22:00 UTC, 17665 kHz (02m:06s – 30m:02s)

Improved signal. Receiver briefly switched to other frequencies to check quality during the recording. IS, ID, “News About Lithuania,” report on the occupation of the Lithuanian Prosecutor’s Office on Friday night (30 March), music, sports news, “Lithuanian by Radio.”

Recording 2 (45 minutes):


9 April 1990, 22:00 UTC, 11770 kHz

Strong signal. Some co-channel interference from Radio Liberty. Receiver briefly switched initially to other frequencies to check signal quality during the recording. IS, ID, “News About Lithuania,” report about the Lithuanian Mission in Moscow, “Around Lithuania,” program in Esperanto (begins around 23m:08s) — a regular feature at the end of Monday broadcasts from Radio Vilnius in English. Interesting sign-off statement: “It’s goodbye and good luck.” On the recording, the Radio Vilnius transmission is followed at 29m:29s (on the same frequency), by the first approximately 15 minutes of a transmission from pro-Moscow Radio Minsk in Belorussian (now usually referred to as Belarusian). The transmission begins with the IS and ID (“Havorits Minsk … Radyjostancyja Saviecki Bielaru?”), followed by a news program.

Recording 3 (32 minutes):


11 January 1991, 23:00 UTC, 7400 kHz

Strong signal. Recording actually starts at about 22:58 UTC with music, the tail-end of a transmission on this frequency, likely from Radio Kiev. Some transmitter hum. Then, Radio Vilnius IS and ID. “We’re still hold up and we hope you can still hear us.” “News About Lithuania” including occupation news, commentary, and reports from the neighbouring Baltic states. Receiver briefly switched to other usual frequencies to check on signal quality (9750, 15180, 17690, and 17720 kHz; 6100 kHz not heard). Transmission ends with “And that’s all we have for our today’s broadcast, we hope not the last one, from Radio Vilnius in the Republic of Lithuania.” This is followed by the transmission schedule and contact information. After about 45 seconds, the Radio Minsk transmission begins with IS and ID.

Recording 4 (45 minutes):


12 January 1991, 23:00 UTC, 9750 kHz

Strong signal. Initial mix-up of interval signals. The first IS is believed to be that of Moskovskaya Radio, the Russian Service of Radio Moscow, followed by a bit of the Radio Moscow World Service IS, and then finally the Radio Vilnius IS. The transmission begins with the statement “We’re still broadcasting from Vilnius.” This is followed by the Lithuanian news reporting on the acts of aggression of the Soviet occupying forces and “Correspondents’ Reports.” The latter includes a report that the exam session at Vilnius University has been postponed to allow students to help protect buildings from the occupation forces, including the Radio and Television Building, and a report on the restrictions on travel. The reports were interrupted with “some news just come in” about a group trying to break into the building of the Council of Ministers. The announcer subsequently reported that the attackers had been put off and so the conflict has been neutralized. The broadcast ends with the statement “We hope to be with you tomorrow again” followed by the transmission schedule and contact information. The Radio Vilnius transmission is followed by the one from Radio Minsk. News organizations reported that Soviet troops entered the Radio and Television Building about 15 minutes after this Radio Vilnius transmission.

Recording 5 (29 minutes):


13 January 1991, 23:00 UTC, 9750 kHz

Strong signal on this and other frequencies usually received except 17690 kHz; only background noise on that frequency. However, there was no Radio Vilnius transmission on any frequency. It had been replaced by light classical and contemporary orchestral music. No IS or announcement of any kind. Music was faded out at 29m:03s before ending. During the recording, the receiver was briefly tuned to other Radio Vilnius frequencies to check on signal quality.

Recording 6 (29 minutes):


30 January 1991, 23:00 UTC, 7400 kHz

Strong signal. The recording begins with a few seconds of music from the previous transmission on this frequency. Then, after about one minute (there was no IS), the Radio Vilnius transmission starts with the beginning of the patriotic song “Lietuvninkai Mes Esam Gim?” (Lithuanians We Are Born) and an introduction stating that the broadcast is coming “from the capital of the independent Republic of Lithuania.” This is followed by “News About Lithuania” including items on further acts of violence by Soviet troops and severe winter weather. Then, there are reports on Lithuanian-Polish relations and the work of the commission on Soviet aggression. Next is an eye-witness report on the attack on the TV tower on the night of 13 January, a report on the current feelings of Lithuanians under occupation, and how music and the arts keep the people going. During the recording, the receiver was briefly tuned to other Radio Vilnius frequencies to check on signal quality. In addition to 7400 kHz, only 9750 and 17690 kHz could be heard.


Richard: Thank you so kindly for sharing these amazing off-air recordings.

Click here to listen to other recordings by Richard Langley.

Posted in International Broadcasting, News, Nostalgia, Radio History, Recordings, Shortwave Radio | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments