Tag Archives: Emilio Ruiz

You’ve Been Warned: Emilio just brought a Grundig Frankenradio to life–!

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor (and certified mad scientist), Emilio Ruiz, who writes:

Recently I was given a broken Grundig G8 Traveler II.¬† This radio had an accident–the case, speaker, tuning knob, and volume controls were all broken or damaged.

I discovered that the tuning and volume controls are not potentiometers, they are a rotary encoders, so I substituted the tiny and broken original controls with rotary encoders (typically used for Arduino projects), but I needed to remove the 10 kiloohms resistor to work properly (only used the CLK, DT, and GND pins).

All materials were reused from other things, the result is like a “Frankenstein radio”.

The “telescopic” antenna is a tape measure/flexometer which was broken too. I replaced the original speaker (which I think was another impedance) with a proper 8 ohms speaker which produced low volume, so i decide add a Pam8403 amplifier module for best performance. The total current drain is 0.10 amp for a regular “loud” audio level.

So the Grundig Frankie is alive!!… It’s alive!!

Click here to view video in new window.

This is brilliant, Emilio! Although this radio is quite scary–and, let’s face it, “post-apocalyptic”–I think it’s absolutely amazing! I love the handle and the tape measure antenna. You, sir, are a mad scientist and I look forward to your next creation! (I’ll just take shelter first!) ūüôā

Anyone else ever created a Frankenradio? Please comment!

Spread the radio love

Can you identify this radio from the 1992 film, ‘Sneakers’–?

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Emilio Ruiz, who writes:

Hi Thomas,

I’m sending you and The SWLing Post readers these screenshots from the cult
movie Sneakers; a great movie about incipient world of hacker security
(phreaking, hacking, cryptography, etc).

In a scene with Robert Redford and Dan Aykroyd, it looks like a radio communications receiver in the background, but i don’t know what brand is.

Could you help for identification?

Great job spotting that radio in the background! Readers: please comment if you can help Emilio identify this rig!

Spread the radio love

The Cat’s Whisker – 50 Years of Wireless Design

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Emilio Ruiz, who notes:

Searching archive.org found this [compilation] book: 50 Years of Wireless Design (click to view on Archive.org)

Click here to download a PDF copy.

I hope it will be interesting for you and the readers of the blog.

[The attached] cartoon is very funny… How eliminate “the hand
capacity”:

Excellent find, Elilio! Thank you for sharing!

Spread the radio love

Emilio’s favorite scene from “Never Cry Wolf”

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Emilio Ruiz, who writes:

I [note you] have published movies scenes with radios and I remember one of my favorite¬†movies about nature, science, silence, wolves and Inuit culture called “Never Cry Wolf” I’m sharing with you and all readers of SWLing Post blog a radio (I don’t know what brand is, I think is military radio) appear in Never Cry Wolf movie.

I love this scene because the heterodyne sound is a particular sound that drives us crazy to everyone who loves radio!! jaja ūüėõ

The video was extracted from the original Beta format movie, sorry for
the quality.

Thank you for sharing, Emilio!

That¬†heterodyne sound leads me to believe they obtained it using a regenerative receiver. I’ve heard that squeal so many times tuning regen receivers!

I’ll add this post to our ever growing archive of radios in film!

Spread the radio love

AM receiver design with regards to IBOC bandwidth claims

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Emilio Ruiz, who writes:

Hi Thomas,

I’m writing because found this (interesting) analysis about radio
components and the impact on radio receiver quality:

http://www.geocities.ws/shreddermanrulz/myth1.htm

I think may be are interesting topic for readers of the SWLing Post.

This is interesting, Emilio.¬† Thank you for sharing. Although the reason the author put together this post was to refute IBOC’s claims about testing AM receivers, it is also a fascinating look into cheap AM radio/receiver design.¬† Thank you for sharing!

Spread the radio love