Tag Archives: Jonathan Marks

BBC News adds daily newscasts in Telugu, Gujarati, Punjabi and Marathi

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Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Jonathan Marks, who shares the following article from Rediff News in which Jim Egan, CEO, BBC Global News, tells Vanita Kohli-Khandekar about the addition of daily newscasts in Telugu, Gujarati, Punjabi and Marathi:

[…]Delhi is by far the BBC’s number one international bureau with over 120 people. This will more than double to 300 by autumn as the language expansion begins.

The BBC is all set to produce daily newscasts in Telugu, Gujarati, Punjabi and Marathi (in addition to the existing Hindi, Tamil and Urdu), which will be distributed through local TV partners.

It will also be expanding its online presence in these languages.

“A lot of people in India tell us ‘My grandfather used to watch the BBC.’ But we don’t want to be remembered by what we were, but what we are,” says Egan.[…]

Click here to read the full interview at Rediff News.

Symposium marking the 90th anniversary of international radio broadcasting in the Netherlands

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Jonathan Marks, who shares the following details about the ‘Keep in touch with the Dutch’: Symposium marking the ninetieth anniversary of international radio broadcasting in the Netherlands, 1927-2017:

(Source: Historici.nl via Jonathan Marks)

‘Keep in touch with the Dutch’:

Symposium marking the ninetieth anniversary of international radio broadcasting in the Netherlands, 1927-2017

Thursday 1 June 2017, 2-5pm

Doelenzaal, Singel 425 Amsterdam

On 1 June 1927 Queen Wilhelmina officially inaugurated international radio broadcasting from the Netherlands with a speech to listeners in the Dutch colonies. This transmission attracted attention from all over the world as it was one of the first times that sound had been transmitted via radio waves across such a distance. In the decades that followed Dutch radio-makers continued to play a pioneering role in international broadcasting, experimenting with new technologies and programming formats. This symposium aims to highlight several themes from this rich history and explore source-materials in order to think about a research agenda in this field and new broadcasting techniques in the digital age.

Program

  • 2.00-2.15pm: Vincent Kuitenbrouwer (University of Amsterdam)
    Introduction
  • 2.15-2.45pm: Bas Agterberg (Beeld en Geluid)
    Everybody Happy? Archiving RNW and the Heritage of Eddy Startz at Sound and Vision
  • 2.45-3.00pm: break
  • 3.00-3.30pm: Jonathan Marks (CEO Critical Distance)
    International Radio Broadcasting in the Era of Amazon Echo
  • 3.30-4.00pm: Rocus de Joode (Independent Consultant at JRCC)
    The Importance of Shortwave, the Madagascar Relay station Now and Then
  • 4.00-4.15pm: break
  • 4.15-5.00pm: Panel: International radio in the digital age
    – Alec Badenoch (University of Utrecht/Vrije Universiteit): Radio Garden
    – Leon Willems and Suzanne Bakker (Free Press Unlimited): Radio Dabanga
  • 5.00-6.00pm: drinks reception

Please register

Vincent Kuitenbrouwer, History Department, University of Amsterdam
Email: j.j.v.kuitenbrouwer@uva.nl

This symposium is sponsored by the Amsterdam School of Historical Studies (ASH) and the Modern History Research Group

If I lived within a reasonable distance of Amsterdam, I would certainly attend this afternoon symposium.  Impressive line-up!

Thank you for sharing, Jonathan!

“The Threat to the BBC Monitoring Service”

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Jonathan Marks, who shares his latest post from Medium.com:

Open Source Stupidity: The Threat to the BBC Monitoring Service

Media Network, the weekly communications magazine formerly on Radio Netherlands, is set to return as an independent podcast in 2017, resuming its analysis of international broadcasting.

The first time we visited BBC Monitoring was in August 1989. That broadcast is sitting in the Media Network Vintage Vault. During the previous lifetime of the programme (1980–2000), we worked closely with colleagues from World Broadcasting Information at BBC Monitoring. Search for contributions from Richard Measham and Chris Greenway in the vintage vault of around 450 half-hour programmes.

By way of a prequel to the new series, we asked John Fertaud, who has worked at BBC Monitoring in the past, to analyse and comment on a new UK government report about the future of the service. Here is his analysis.

Click here to read Jonathan’s full post and to listen to his Vintage Vault audio.

Media Network updates and 1999 interview with acting ABC general manager Mike Bird

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Jonathan Marks, who writes:

Found a rather topical edition of media network and posted it[…]with Mike Bird talking about shortwave and Radio Australia. http://jonathanmarks.libsyn.com/mn16121999

[Additionally] I have started the prequels to Media Network’s return in 2017.

I found a great cassette sent to me by Africa media correspondent Richard Ginbey in 1989. Richard was a music presenter, first in South Africa, later moving to Windhoek. But I guess his passion was listening to his shortwave radio. And with nothing more than a cassette recorder he put together some fascinating portraits of broadcasting history as observed from a listeners’ perspective.

Richard also made features which traced the history of broadcasting in Africa, making some recordings which track the path to independence for many countries. I’m pretty sure many of these bandscans from the 1980’s and before have long since disappeared from official archives. So, here’s a chance to listen again to Richard Ginbey’s media view. I’ve put together several episodes back to back. Enjoy.

There is over 70 minutes of unique material here.

http://jonathanmarks.libsyn.com/mn06122017?tdest_id=87154

Thank you so much for sharing this, Jonathan. I might contact you soon about adding those cassette recordings to the shortwave archive. Absolutely priceless stuff!  And the return of Media Networks? Please keep us informed!

Photos from the final Danish Shortwave Club International meeting

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Jonathan Marks, who shares the following photos he snapped during the final meeting of the DSWCI meeting (click images to enlarge):

Anker Petersen kicks off the final DSCWI meeting of all.

Anker Petersen kicks off the final DSCWI meeting of all.

The group shot outside the longwave transmitter at Kalundborg, about 1 and a half train ride from Copenhagen.

The group shot outside the longwave transmitter at Kalundborg, about 1 and a half train ride from Copenhagen.

Danish Radio is doing some interesting experiments with AM on this site as a back-up technology to DAB+.

Danish Radio is doing some interesting experiments with AM on this site as a back-up technology to DAB+.

 Anker Petersen hosts the final DSCWI dinner at a great restaurant in Kalundborg.

Anker Petersen hosts the final DSCWI dinner at a great restaurant in Kalundborg.

The town of Kalundborg, famous for its church with 5 spires - and its longwave transmitter still used by the fishing fleet.

The town of Kalundborg, famous for its church with 5 spires – and its longwave transmitter still used by the fishing fleet.

Victor Goonetilleke, early DSCWI member, travelled from Sri Lanka to be part of the historic gathering.

Victor Goonetilleke, early DSCWI member, travelled from Sri Lanka to be part of the historic gathering.

Thank you for sharing these photos, Jonathan. It’s sad to see an institution like the DSWCI come to an end–especially because clubs like this become an amazing venue for friends to meet.

Update: Jonathan notes that he’s posted more photos on his flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jonathanmarks/