Tag Archives: Shortwave Radio

Shortwave Radio Recordings: Radio Thailand English language service

Paul-Walker-Galena-Alaska

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Paul Walker, who shares this recording from his home in Galena, Alaska. Paul notes:

Radio Thailand (13745 kHz) English service to North America at 0000UTC on November 8th, 2016:

Click here to view on YouTube.

Not the strongest I ever hear them, but a good solid clean nearly noise and nearly fade free signal.

That’s an impressive signal, Paul, especially considering the fact that propagation conditions have been somewhat shaky as of late. Thanks for sharing!

Which is the best? Sony ICF-2001D/2010 or ICF-SW77?

sony-test

Hi there, subscribers to my YouTube channel Oxford Shortwave Log  will be aware that I currently operate both of these wonderful vintage portables. I purchased the ICF-2001D only 18 months ago from eBay, based largely on its reputation as one of the best performing portables ever made. Previously I had been using my excellent ICF-SW55 as the mainstay receiver for my numerous DXpeditions, coupled with irregular appearances from my Sangean ATS-803A and the excellent value-for-money Tecsun PL-360. The ICF-2001D proved to be a revelation in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and contrary to popular belief, with careful planning (to avoid crowded bands), is able to cope pretty well with very large antennas. As regards audio bandwidth filtering, SSB and synchronous detection, in my experience, the ICF-2001D is as good as it gets in a portable – or a vintage portable at least. I have lost count of the number of personal-firsts I’ve achieved using this wonderful receiver and as someone who likes to push the envelope a little, I soon started to wonder whether it’s replacement, the ICF-SW77 might prove to be an even better performer. Subsequent online research  confirmed there was no absolute consensus on this issue, with followers of these two great receivers firmly placed in both camps.

Sometime later, a good friend of mine, fellow radio hobbyist and subscriber to Oxford Shortwave Log very kindly offered to send me his cherished ICF-SW77 on long-term loan. Like me, he was intrigued to know how it compared to it’s venerable predecessor and thus the deal was done! Upon it’s arrival in July, I started planning a back-to-back series of comparison tests at the very quiet wood in Oxfordshire I used for my DX’peditions, using the same antenna for both recievers – the excellent Wellbrook ALA1530 active loop. In total, I made fourteen reception videos comparing the ICF-2001D and ICF-SW77 and posted them to Oxford Shortwave Log. Both receivers performed very well, delivering excellent reception on the Tropical Band and elsewhere on the shortwave spectrum from Bolivia, Brazil, Guatemala, amongst others. At the halfway stage, I generated a video to summarise the results to-date and this will follow in my next post to swling.com.  In the meantime, I hope you enjoy the first half of the reception videos; which follow below:



Clint Gouveia is the author of this post and a regular contributor to the SWLing Post. Clint actively publishes videos of his shortwave radio excursions on his YouTube channel: Oxford Shortwave Log. Clint is based in Oxfordshire, England.

DXtreme Station Log 12

dxtreme-station-log-12

(Source: DXtreme Press Release)

Product Announcement: DXtreme Station Log 12

DXtreme Software™ has released a new version of its popular logging program for

Amateur Radio operators: DXtreme Station Log 12™.

New Features in DXtreme Station Log 12

  • Automatic LoTW Upload Users can set Station Log 12 so it uploads each log entry to LoTW automatically when added, capturing and saving QSO Record Status from the LoTW server as part of the process. Modified log entries can be uploaded as well. If desired, users can disable automatic uploading and can upload log entries to LoTW semiautomatically and manually in batches whenever they want to.
  • LoTW Reporting Users can perform searches and run reports filtered by LoTW QSO Record Status, which indicates whether log entries are On, or Not On, the LoTW server following upload or QSL-updating. Users can also perform searches and run reports filtered by LoTW QSL Record Status, which indicates the date of each LoTW QSL record processed by DXtreme’s LoTW QSL Update Utility.
  • JT65A and JT9 Contact Pre-fill Right-clicking the New button presents a shortcut menu that lets users pre-fill the Station Log window with log information from a JT65A or JT9 contact completed on WSJT-X or JT65-HF-HB9HQX Edition.
  • Afreet Ham CAP Integration Expansion Station Log 12 now integrates with optional Afreet Ham CAP throughout the program. Users activate Ham CAP by requesting short- or long-path propagation predictions on spotted and logged stations and entities.
  • Quick Find A box on the Station Log toolbar lets users type a call sign and press Enter to search quickly for a station in their log. If the call is in the log, a list of QSOs with it appears on a popup window. If desired, the list of log entries can be loaded into the Station Log window for viewing or editing, one log entry at a time.
  • Improv Imaging™ — Lets users associate adhoc images with their log entries. This feature is like, but separate from, our popular QSL Imaging™ facility. Users can capture, scan, or paste any image and save it as a single-page .jpg, or single- or multi-page .tif. Improv images popular with users include signals on a spectrum analyzer or waterfall, QSOs conducted on Amateur Television and data applications, and rigs and antennas used during contacts.
  • Other Imaging Enhancements The QSL image previewer on the Station Log window is larger, as is the QSL Image Explorer, which also lets users call-up, in the Station Log window, the log entry associated with each QSL image, making the Explorer act like a Search window. Improv Imaging has its own, dedicated previewer and explorer.
  • UX Improvements Users can apply foreground and background colors and font attributes to grid headings and data rows throughout the program.

Standard Features in DXtreme Station Log 12

DXtreme Station Log 12 lets hams log their contacts and import ADIF files from other programs. It supports major call sign subscription services, and offers the following multimedia and advanced functions:

  • DX Spot Checker™ Receives DX spots from Telnet-based servers, and determines whether QSOs are needed for new or verified DXCC® entities, band-entities, mode-entities, or VUCC grids.
  • DX Atlas Integration Performs DX Atlas azimuth plots from the user’s location to that of a spotted or logged station. Also creates maps for a variety of reports.
  • Band Master Integration Afreet Band Master can be invoked with needed band and IOTA lists based on the user’s Station Log 12 database.
  • Rig Control Tunes/retrieves frequencies and modes from supported rigs through integration with Afreet Omni-Rig.
  • QSL Processing Creates QSL and address labels for physical QSLs, and supports the ARRL’s LoTW facility, including capturing LoTW QSL records as digital images.
  • Audio Facility Records and plays QSOs.
  • Reports Provides a wide range of performance and station reports to let users see how well they’re doing. Reports can be filtered and sorted. Includes DXCC® and WAS Analytics™ tools for analyzing and enhancing DXCC and WAS standing.

Operating System and Requirements

DXtreme Station Log 12 runs in 32- and 64-bit versions of Microsoft® Windows® 10, Windows 8.1, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista®, and Windows XP.

Pricing and Support

DXtreme Station Log 12 retails for $89.95 USD worldwide for Internet distribution. Reduced pricing is available for upgrading users, and CD shipment is available at a nominal surcharge. All prices include product support by Internet e-mail.

About DXtreme Software

Based in Nashua, NH, DXtreme Software produces powerful and easy-to-use logging applications for all kinds of radio enthusiasts — from short-wave and medium-wave listeners and DXers to Amateur Radio operators. For more information about DXtreme Station Log 12, visit www.dxtreme.com or contact Bob Raymond, NE1I, at bobraymond@dxtreme.com.

DXCC® is a registered trademark of the American Radio Relay League, Inc.

Microsoft®, Windows®, and Vista® are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.

Band Master, DX Atlas, Ham CAP, and Omni-Rig are owned by Afreet Software, Inc. A purchased software license for Band Master and DX Atlas are required to use them.

JT65-HF HB9HQX Edition is owned by Beat Oehrli, HB9HQX. WSJT-X is owned by Joe Taylor, K1JT.

Oxford Shortwave Log: dxing in the tropical rainforest of Pará, Brazil – part 1

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Hi there, I was fortunate enough recently for my work to take me to a very remote area of tropical rainforest in Pará, Northern Brazil and of course, I travelled with a shortwave radio. In fact I take a portable with me everywhere – even to work – just in case. During this trip I was using a Tecsun PL-680, for very specific reasons:


  • It can handle a longwire very well without overloading (I actually only used a 5 metre wire)
  • An excellent synchronous detection circuit and audio bandwidth filtering options
  • Excellent sensitivity, as demonstrating by the many DX reception videos on YouTube
  • If it got lost or damaged it would be a pain of course, but not difficult to replace

pl-680

img_9928 img_0221Although effectively travelling on business, I was hoping to find the time for a DXing session because I felt it would be really interesting to find out what could be heard on shortwave (and medium wave for that matter) out in the jungle, in the middle of nowhere! The environment was challenging – around 37/38 degrees C during the day and still 33 degrees C at 2 am, all day and night, every day and night! Furthermore, as you might imagine for a tropical location, the place was crawling with bugs lol, including mosquitos and thus a number of vaccinations were necessary, prior to the trip. Several days after arriving, I eventually managed to find the time for a DXing session in the jungle (with another the following week in Barcarena, on the coast).

So, what can you hear in the jungle? Part 1 of my group of reception videos follow below – I hope you enjoy them.


Tropical rainforest DX in Pará, Brazil: Radio Romania International 7335 kHz

 

Tropical rainforest SW in Pará, Brazil: Radio Nacional Brazilia 6180 kHz

 

Tropical rainforest DX in Pará, Brazil: WHRI 7385 kHz, Cypress Creek, Georgia, USA

 

Tropical rainforest DX in Pará, Brazil: Radio Mediterranee 9575 kHz, Nador, Morocco

 

Tropical rainforest DX in Pará, Brazil: EWTN (WEWN) 11520 kHz Vandiver, Alabama, USA

 

Clint Gouveia is the author of this post and a regular contributor to the SWLing Post. Clint actively publishes videos of his shortwave radio excursions on his YouTube channel: Oxford Shortwave Log. Clint is based in Oxfordshire, England.

HDSDR publishes a new Beta release

hdsdr-screenshot

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor Mike Ladd who notes that HDSDR has just published a new 2.75 Beta release.

Mike included the screenshot (above) which includes the following release notes:

hdsdr-screenshot

Click here for the HDSDR website and to download the new Beta release.

Thanks for the tip, Mike!