Tag Archives: boat anchors

Boat Anchors at Voice of Aladdin ARC Columbus Hamfest

A guest post by Eric McFadden, WD8RIF

I had the pleasure of attending the annual Voice of Aladdin Amateur Radio Club’s Columbus Hamfest this past weekend, on Saturday, August 4, 2018. The Columbus Hamfest is a smaller, local or regional hamfest but every year when I attend I’m pleasantly surprised by the presence of a really nice variety of fine used gear available at the event. This year was no exception.

I made snaps of some of the fine old “boat anchors” and some of the not-so-old stuff available at the hamfest. (And I must apologize for the flaring evident in some of the photos. It seems the lens in my MotoE4 smartphone is prone to flaring in direct sunlight—somehow, up this point I had not managed to discover this.)

Realistic DX-160

Realistic DX-160

Central Electronics "Multiphase Exciter Model 20-A" transmitter

Central Electronics “Multiphase Exciter Model 20-A” transmitter

Yaesu FT-101EX transceiver and accessories

Yaesu FT-101EX transceiver and accessories

Collins R-388/URR receiver

Collins R-388/URR receiver

Drake R8 receiver

Drake R8 receiver

Johnson Viking Ranger transmitter

Johnson Viking Ranger transmitter

A selection of MFJ single-band QRP (low power) CW-only transceivers and a vintage Heathkit SWR bridge

A selection of MFJ single-band QRP (low power) CW-only transceivers and a vintage Heathkit SWR bridge

At the event, I hadn’t noticed how many of the vintage receivers were made by Hallicrafters.

Hallicrafters "Sky Buddy"

Hallicrafters “Sky Buddy”

Hallicrafters HT-32A transmitter

Hallicrafters HT-32A transmitter

Hallicrafters SX-101 receiver

Hallicrafters SX-101 receiver

Hallicrafters SX-111 receiver

Hallicrafters SX-111 receiver

Hallicrafters SX-99 receiver

Hallicrafters SX-99 receiver

Heathkit DX-100 (bottom) and Hallicrafters HT-37 transmitters

Heathkit DX-100 (bottom) and Hallicrafters HT-37 transmitters

And while not a radio, this is certainly vintage and is very pretty—and it was for sale.

1966 Chevrolet pickup-truck (it was for sale)

1966 Chevrolet pickup-truck (it was for sale)

1966 Chevrolet pickup-truck (it was for sale)

1966 Chevrolet pickup-truck (it was for sale)

1966 Chevrolet pickup-truck (it was for sale)

1966 Chevrolet pickup-truck (it was for sale)

 

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Boat Anchor Tuesday: Hallicrafters S-40B and SX-100

Many thanks to SWLing Post contributor, Chris Peters, who shares the above photo for Boat Anchor Tuesday and writes:

I was lucky enough to recently pick up both these familiar faces for $150.

Hallicrafters S-40B and SX-100

Both are in decent shape but are due for a recap and alignment.

Wow–both of these are classic sets, Chris! After a recap and alignment, I think you’ll especially be impressed with the performance that SX-100 delivers! Thank you for sharing!

Post readers: If you’d like to share a photo of your boat anchor on Boat Anchor Tuesdaysimply send me an email with the photo and a short description. I’ll put it in the pipeline to publish!

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Share your photos on Boat Anchor Tuesday!

Yesterday, as I took a little time to curate a massive collection of photos I took at the Museum of Radio and Technology, I posted a few “boat anchor” (heavy metal vintage radio) photos and labelled them “Boat Anchor Tuesday” on Twitter and Facebook.

Much to my surprise, I received a number of comments and emails with readers asking for more Boat Anchor Tuesday pics!

So I’ve decided to make it a feature here on the SWLing Post. After all, anyone who knows me knows that I’m a massive fan of boat anchors!

Your photos on Boat Anchor Tuesday!

Please send me a photo (or a few) of your favorite boat anchor. Every Tuesday, I’ll feature a reader’s boat anchor here on the SWLing Post.

If you can, include a few sentences about the radio: how you obtained it, what you like about it or any memories. We radio nostalgic people love this stuff!

Please send photo(s) and radio blurb to my email address found on our Contact page. I only plan to post one radio per week, so these will be scheduled far ahead to post automatically.

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South African Antique Wireless Association Valve QSO Party on May 6, 2018

(Source: Southgate ARC)

Antique Wireless Association Valve QSO Party

The AWA Valve QSO Party is a phone contest held over two sessions on Saturday 5 and Sunday 6 May 2018.

On Saturday afternoon the AM session will be on the air from 13:00 to 17:00 UTC and on Sunday the SSB session will run from 13:00 to 17:00 UTC.

Activity on both days takes place on 40 metres between 7 063 and 7 100 kHz and on 80 metres between 3 603 and 3650 kHz with your call sign a RS report, a consecutive serial number starting at 001 and the type of radio used, e.g. HT37 Tx as the exchange.

Log sheets must be submitted by 25 May by e-mail to andyzs6ady@vodamail.co.za or by mail to the Antique Wireless Association of Southern Africa, PO Box 12320, Benoryn, 1504.

Certificates will be awarded to the first three places in each category (AM/SSB). Please consult the 2018 SARL Contest Manual for all the information.

The South African Radio League

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The National HRO-5TA1: Parting is such sweet sorrow…

As I mentioned in a previous post, I’m in the process of selling and giving away radio gear that I no longer use or that’s been sitting on the workbench way too long.

This is an easier process when it involves modern gear, as I have comparatively little attachment to radios I could go out and purchase once again, should I feel so moved. The only modern portables I keep, regardless, are those I must have on hand for comparison testing and reviews. And, yes, I do have a number of favorites I never intend to sell.

But when it comes to vintage gear?  Letting go is hard to do.

A few years ago, I acquired a bunch of vintage gear and accessories from a friend whose father was a radio operator in WWII. Since then, I’ve been selling this equipment and giving the proceeds to our non-profit (ETOW). I’ve also donated a lot of equipment to the Hickory Aviation Museum in North Carolina––I’m a member, and have been piecing together an AN/ARC-8 system for permanent display (only now lacking a good BC-348).

The only receiver I kept for myself was a National HRO-5TA1. It’s totally original and has likely not been operated since the late 1940s.

In a sense, this is the radio equivalent of a “barn find.”

I love the HRO dial and the overall aesthetics of this vintage set.  It absolutely shouts “1940s” radio––! These sets were initially manufactured during WWII under some large orders. Indeed, the “H.R.O.” acronym is said to be the National internal designation of the series…meaning, “Hellva Rush Order.” There were many variations of the National HRO; mine was the 1946 “5TA1.”

The HRO-5TA1 uses coils to change bands. My HRO has the full set of coils and even the coil box. To change coils, you simply pull out (unplug) the coil from the front of the receiver and plug in a new one.

The power supply is self-contained and connects to the HRP-5TA1 via a four conductor plug.

The back panel of the receiver couldn’t be more simple.

Inside, it’s impressively clean for its age; check this out:

If you can’t tell, letting this one go is going to be one of the toughest I’ve experienced. Parting will, indeed, be sweet sorrow. I must give someone else an opportunity to put this girl on the air, else it will sit here for many more years before I have an opportunity to do the necessary upgrades to make her airworthy again (needs at least recapping).

This weekend, my buddy, Vlado (N3CZ) and I will reserve a couple of tables at the Greenwood, SC hamfest. Unless I sell the HRO-5TA1 beforehand, you’ll find it on my table there!

On that note, readers, please comment if you have a suggestion what I should charge for this set. You can also comment if you think I’m crazy for selling it. It’s not going to be easy!

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